Future topics

There is plenty to write about, if I have infinite time and energy, on subjects related to music and why it’s important to continue to ask such questions and engage science to find the answers. Or interview people with insight and foresight,…

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When I got online tonight (Friday 10th April 2009 at 10:30 pm) I had intended to reflect upon our recent concert in Amsterdam. Then I got sidetracked by interesting articles on benefits of music on children, adults, and the elderly; the importance of programme notes; and various summaries of medical reports and other indepth reportage as discovered and collated by the Unlikely Entrepreneur Cynthia Wunsch.

Her blogs led me to Science Daily, where I quickly searched on the topic of music. There I found “When musicians play along together it isn’t just their instruments that are in time – their brain waves are too” in the article titled “Guitarists’ Brains Swing Together.” Being closely synchronised is a main challenge and requirement in our piano and guitar duo playing. I wonder if our brains are in tune with each other.

A few months ago, just before Christmas 2008, I had bookmarked an article in the Economist, called “Why Music?” Shakespeare’s “if music be the food of love, play on…” sums up the themes of my life: music, food, and love, albeit not necessarily in that order. The article is worth reading again and again. I noticed it because I had simultaneously found another article on music and the mind in the Gramophone magazine (Dec 2008).

There is plenty to write about, if I have infinite time and energy, on subjects related to music and why it’s important to continue to ask such questions and engage science to find the answers. Or interview people with insight and foresight, such as human resource professionals who see skill deficiencies in today’s labour force. They say that “Workers benefit more from art than math and science.Now that’s a welcoming thought — that my return to full-time education to study music, after a left-brained education & employment, was not in vain. Is the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) the new MBA (Master of Business Administration)?

I shall add to this blog entry when I see more topics to write about. Earlier today, I had an idea to arrange music for piano and guitar, compose something that would be interesting for us to play, and …. I need a depository to store my ideas before they vanish or get replaced!

Last stop on earth

Do the residents know this is their last stop on earth? Will our music make any difference?

When we go and shake their hands afterwards, we could sense they’re trying to tell us something with their watery eyes and lingering grips.

We entered the grey building from the back, where we had barely found a spot to park the car.

“Are you sure you want to take this entrance?” asked the Dutch guitarist suspiciously.

“Why not?” I noticed it looked like a door for staff only. “What does it say?”

“It says morgue in Dutch.”

“You mean, dead bodies?”

It suddenly dawned on me why we were invited a second time to give a memorial concert at a large nursing home in Amsterdam a year ago. They held such concerts four times a year. Those were sombre events preceded by dinner with the staff. I had played the piano solo version of my Elegy there. They loved the slow movement of Chopin’s piano concerto in E minor.

Do the residents know this is their last stop on earth? Will our music make any difference?

When we go and shake their hands afterwards, we could sense they’re trying to tell us something with their watery eyes and lingering grips.

In the early days, we’d try very hard to get to know the residents at the smaller elderly homes, some as few as a handful of well-dressed octogenarians. We would greet them and chat with them while sharing tea and snacks together. Those were cozy settings in stately homes a few hundred years old. After a year of driving two hours each way to villages near the German border and appearing at the same homes once a month, we abandoned our futile attempts to bond with these nearly forgotten citizens.

What we could be sure of, from those visits, was that live music did indeed make a difference. It released them from the present. They spoke with their eyes. Conversations didn’t matter. They chose to remember the long ago past, before we were born.