The real thing

After you’ve spent time hearing of, reading about, listening to, discussing with, talking about, and writing about something, you become familiar with it. When you finally get to see or experience the real thing, you value and appreciate it more.

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When audio recording technology was invented, there was fear that fewer people would attend live performances.

When sheet music printing became possible, there was fear that people would learn the music and compete with professional performers.

The arrival of the Internet, mobile telephony, smart phones, iPads, Youtube, and Pandora radio made recorded performances searchable and easily downloadable.

All this helped to familiarize listeners and popularize music, composers, and performers.

What does this do for live performances? The audience becomes more informed and more appreciative. It increases the value of attending live concerts.

Radio shows, TV shows, written reviews, and blogs about music and musicians all serve to inform and educate.

We, as the audience, can choose better than before.

Most of us find comfort in the familiar. How much more familiar can we be of a subject that we’ve read about, heard of, discussed with, talked about, and perhaps even written about.

A music, like a movie, a painting, a novel, or any other creative output, requires that process of familiarization before it achieves value to the listener.

Author: BLOGmaiden

As one of the earliest bloggers (since 1999), I enjoy meeting people who embrace "out-of-the-box" thinking and fear not the unknown. I believe in collaboration for sustainability because it increases stakeholder value.

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